<We_can_help/>

What are you looking for?

<Good_things_happen/> Welcome to Conference

Copyright @ Select-themes

Follow us

Want to attend the MOVE Congress in Birmingham from 4-6 October, but can’t squeeze three days out of your working week? Not to worry – we are now offering a day pass for UK participants to give you a chance to drop in on a day that suits you.

One day fee registrations can only be made via e-mail, by contacting our secretariat at [email protected].

Check out the MOVE Congress programme, which features speakers from 9 countries and 3 continents who have their fingers on the pulse of the latest trends in physical activity promotion. And get you business card ready to network with delegates from 6 continents.

Interested in physical activity in urban spaces? Then the MOVEment Spaces sessions on 5 October could be the ticket for you.

Perhaps you want to reach the hard-to-reach members of your community? Then learn from the experts in the Removing Barriers – Getting it Right sessions on 5 October.

Maybe you’re into new physical activity trends – such as getting back to nature? Then you won’t want to miss the Me Time, Wellbeing Time, WILD Time! sessions on 6 October, hosted by the Wild Network.

Working in physical education and school sport? Learn new tips and tricks from innovators in the sector in the Active School Communities sessions on 6 October.

Need more reasons to take a day out of the office?

Get your ticket by contacting us at [email protected]ess.com and see you in October!

Want to attend the MOVE Congress in Birmingham from 4-6 October, but can't squeeze three days out of your working week? Not to worry - we are now offering a day pass for UK participants to give you a chance to drop in on a day that suits you. One day fee registrations can only be made via e-mail, by contacting our secretariat at [email protected] Check out the MOVE Congress programme, which features speakers from 9 countries and 3 continents who have

By Jonathan N Hooshmand, Researcher in Public Health, University of Miami KiDZ Neuroscience Center, USA.  Safe Routes to School, Vision Zero, and Complete Streets are three movements that have gained increasing attention and support in the United States. These movements support not only active transportation and the right to move, but most importantly, the right to move safely in one’s community. In an age of abundant standardized testing and decreased recreation in U.S. classrooms, it’s important that we provide our children with

We have the Human Right to MOVE. But what if our urban environments don’t allow us to move as freely as we would like? If you don’t live in one of Europe's top 6 cycling cities, getting around on two wheels with or without a helmet might seem like a death-defying exercise. But what if cities invested more in safe cycle paths and awareness campaigns for motorists? Cycling infrastructure such as Copenhagen’s Bicycle Snake (Cykelslangen), which created both an architect’s delight

ISCA is happy to announce that for this MOVE Congress we are launching an event-based app that will be your pocket guide throughout the conference. Featuring all the relevant information, from the programme (“agenda”) and speakers to the participants’ list, the app will allow you to experience the MOVE Congress in a completely new way. This also means that you will not be exhausted with one-too-many handouts that are most likely to be forgotten in one of the meeting rooms. Let’s

City dwellers usually have three choices to commute to work: by car, public transport and the third, more active way – by pedal power or walking. Looking at your city in a different way opens up new possibilities for physical activity. Breaking our routines and defying the dangers is the first step to finding easy solutions. Like making the transition from inactive to active transport: Whether it is getting off one stop earlier to walk the last leg to work, trying

Moving around in modern skyscrapers and high buildings is far more convenient than dangerous rope-climbing. However, choosing to step into a box – the elevator – is another disservice that we voluntarily do to ourselves every day. Simply put, we forget to exercise our Human Right to MOVE. We’ve all seen the sign: “Use the stairs only in case of emergency!” Everywhere we go, we are more and more discouraged to take the stairs and choose the elevator instead although there

Guest blog post by Chris Wright, Youth Sport Trust. With increasing changes to lifestyle and new social norms around being sedentary becoming widespread, we now have children dying 5 years earlier than the previous generation due to inactivity. Children are spending more time sitting down or not moving at a higher frequency than ever before. Prolonged periods sat down actually starts the ageing process early in children as young as the age of 6, hardening the arteries and creating inflammation in the

Do physical activity promoters need to find more evidence to support their case for support and other advocacy efforts? Absolutely, says Dr Richard Bailey, Senior Researcher at the International Council of Sport Science and Physical Education (ICSSPE). But it has to be quality evidence from experts, and a collaborative effort is needed to get it noticed. Bailey gave an entertaining and eye-opening presentation on the power of advocacy at ISCA's Moving Europe - Moving People conference in Ljubljana last year. This

8th MOVE Congress focuses on the human right to MOVE. We, humans, have made it difficult to be active. It's easy to invent new barriers rather than find solutions to the existing problems. This MOVE Congress is about to change that. Inviting the leading organisations and people to Birmingham, we will look for solutions on how to enable our fellow citizens to start moving again. Become one of the early birds and join the MOVE Congress in Birmingham, UK.

We all have the Human Right to MOVE. For some of us, this right gets restricted by the way our lifestyles have developed – either by sitting for hours at work, by machines transporting us around, or by the busy urban settings we live in. But what about those who are completely restricted – do prisoners have the right to move and participate in recreational physical activity, for example? This question is bound to prompt a debate wherever it is asked.

Join us at the 9th MOVE Congress in Budapest, Hungary, 16-18 October 2019.