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Interview with Youth Sport Trust Chief Executive Ali Oliver.

“This movement represents everything that we believe in – the right of every child to move and the importance of that in their day-to-day lives.”

When Youth Sport Trust Chief Executive Ali Oliver led our Active School Communities plenary session at the MOVE Congress 2017 in Birmingham, she underlined the importance of prioritising physical education and new, innovative ways of getting kids active at school and out of school hours. It is a battle to work against the trend of sedentary activities and technologies, but it is an essential movement to enable children’s rights to move around, she said.

A woman from her team who shares the same passion and helped set up the Youth Sport Trust in the UK, Helen Vost, is our latest confirmed speaker who will present a new EU Physical Activity Label for Schools at the MOVE Congress in Budapest on 18 October 2019.

But in our exclusive interview below, ISCA catches some reflections from Ali Oliver on her experience of the MOVE Congress and its theme the Human Right to MOVE.

We have the Human Right to MOVE, so what’s stopping us?

Ali Oliver: “What’s stopping us? Where to start on that question? What’s stopping us is a whole range of things – everything from changes in technology that are creating a more sedentary environment. Everything is easy to do now.

I think things are changing for us, particularly in schools, where the academic pressures of other subjects are often squeezing out time for physical education, physical activity and sport. I think there are lots of things that demand children’s attention now, so if physical activity isn’t fun enough, isn’t exciting enough, that could be a barrier to young people doing it, not because we’re necessarily put them off, but because there are other exciting things for them to do.

So there are so many answers to that question and the purpose of the Congress is to move some of those barriers away and learn from each other.”

How do you see the potential of events like the MOVE Congress to facilitate change?

Ali Oliver: “Things like the MOVE Congress help us realise that we’re all dealing with the same issues – we’re in different countries but the issues are the same. And once we’re united in that understanding, the great thing is that every country will come at the problem from a different angle.

Just sitting in the sessions and listening to people we can learn so much from each other. And then, importantly, we can use what we are learning in other countries to advocate and influence decision makers in our own nations. Whether that is school leaders, policy makers or whether it’s as simple as families, parents and carers of young people.”

There are so many more angles to explore when it comes to school sport and physical activity in schools. It is also natural that with the Hungarian School Sport Federation (HSSF) as our organising partner, we have dedicated a whole new track to Discovering new perspectives on physical activity promotion among school children – featuring the results and way forward for HSSF’s EU Physical Activity Label for Schools project.

Get into the discussion – book your seat today

Interview with Youth Sport Trust Chief Executive Ali Oliver. “This movement represents everything that we believe in – the right of every child to move and the importance of that in their day-to-day lives.” When Youth Sport Trust Chief Executive Ali Oliver led our Active School Communities plenary session at the MOVE Congress 2017 in Birmingham, she underlined the importance of prioritising physical education and new, innovative ways of getting kids active at school and out of school hours. It is a

Want to attend the MOVE Congress in Birmingham from 4-6 October, but can't squeeze three days out of your working week? Not to worry - we are now offering a day pass for UK participants to give you a chance to drop in on a day that suits you. One day fee registrations can only be made via e-mail, by contacting our secretariat at [email protected] Check out the MOVE Congress programme, which features speakers from 9 countries and 3 continents who have

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ISCA is happy to announce that for this MOVE Congress we are launching an event-based app that will be your pocket guide throughout the conference. Featuring all the relevant information, from the programme (“agenda”) and speakers to the participants’ list, the app will allow you to experience the MOVE Congress in a completely new way. This also means that you will not be exhausted with one-too-many handouts that are most likely to be forgotten in one of the meeting rooms. Let’s

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Guest blog post by Chris Wright, Youth Sport Trust. With increasing changes to lifestyle and new social norms around being sedentary becoming widespread, we now have children dying 5 years earlier than the previous generation due to inactivity. Children are spending more time sitting down or not moving at a higher frequency than ever before. Prolonged periods sat down actually starts the ageing process early in children as young as the age of 6, hardening the arteries and creating inflammation in the

Do physical activity promoters need to find more evidence to support their case for support and other advocacy efforts? Absolutely, says Dr Richard Bailey, Senior Researcher at the International Council of Sport Science and Physical Education (ICSSPE). But it has to be quality evidence from experts, and a collaborative effort is needed to get it noticed. Bailey gave an entertaining and eye-opening presentation on the power of advocacy at ISCA's Moving Europe - Moving People conference in Ljubljana last year. This

8th MOVE Congress focuses on the human right to MOVE. We, humans, have made it difficult to be active. It's easy to invent new barriers rather than find solutions to the existing problems. This MOVE Congress is about to change that. Inviting the leading organisations and people to Birmingham, we will look for solutions on how to enable our fellow citizens to start moving again. Become one of the early birds and join the MOVE Congress in Birmingham, UK.